Curator

As a reputation management pioneer, Nick has the inside scoop on all things Reputation Management. This blog will focus on Reputation, practices, technologies, providers and re-shared content from some of the preeminent players in the industry. We hope you enjoy!

Posts By: Curator

Tasty SEO Report Recipes to Save Time & Add Value for Clients [Next Level]

Posted by jocameron

Reporting can be the height of tedium. You spend your time making those reports, your client may (or may not) spend their time trying to understand them. And then, in the end, we’re all left with some unanswered questions and a rumble in the tum of dissatisfaction.

I’m going to take some basic metrics, throw in some culinary metaphors, and take your client reporting to the next level.

By the end of this article you’ll know how to whip up intelligent SEO reports for your clients (or potential clients) that will deliver actionable insights any search chef worth their salt would be proud of.

[Part one] Freshly foraged keywords on sourdough to power your campaign

I’ve got intel on some really tasty keywords; did you know you can scoop these up like wild porcini mushrooms using your website categories? The trick is to find the keywords that you can use to make a lovely risotto, and discard the ones that taste nasty.

The overabundance of keywords has become a bit of a challenge for SEOs. Google is better at gauging user intent — it’s kind of their thing, right? This results in the types of keywords that send traffic to your clients expanding, and it’s becoming trickier to track every. single. keyword. Of course, with a budget big enough almost anything is possible, but why hemorrhage cash on tracking the keyword minutiae when you can wrangle intelligent data by tracking a sample of keywords from a few pots?

With Keyword Explorer, you can save your foraged terms to lists. By bundling together similar “species,” you’ll get a top-level view of the breadth and depth of search behavior within the categories of your niche. Easily compare volume, difficulty, opportunity, and potential to instigate a data-driven approach to website architecture. You’ll also know, at a glance, where to expand on certain topics and apply more resources to content creation.

With these metrics in hand and your client’s industry knowledge, you can cherry-pick keywords to track ranking positions week over week and add them to your Moz Pro campaign with the click of a button.

What’s the recipe?

Step 1: Pluck keywords from the category pages of your client’s site.

Step 2: Find keyword suggestions in Keyword Explorer.

Step 3: Group by low lexicon to bundle together similar keywords to gather up that long tail.

Step 4: Analyze and save relevant results to a list

Step 5: Head to the Keyword Lists and compare the metrics: where is the opportunity? Can you compete with the level of difficulty? Is there a high-volume long tail that you can dig in to?

Step 6: Add sample keywords from your pots directly to your campaign.

Bonus step: Repeat for products or other topic segments of the niche.

Don’t forget to drill into the keywords that are turning up here to see if there are categories and subcategories you hadn’t thought of. These can be targeted in existing content to further extend the relevancy and reach of your client’s content. Or it may inspire new content which can help to grow the authority of the site.

Why your client will be impressed

Through solid, informed research, you’ll be able to demonstrate why their site should be structured with certain categories on the top-level navigation right down to product pages. You’ll also be able to prioritize work on building, improving, or refining content on certain sections of the site by understanding the breakdown of search behavior and demand. Are you seeing lots of keywords with a good level of volume and lower difficulty? Or more in-depth long tail with low search volume? Or fewer different keywords with high search volume but stronger competition?

Let the demand drive the machine forward and make sure you’re giving the hordes what they want.

All this helps to further develop your understanding of the ways people search so you can make informed decisions about which keywords to track.

[Part two] Palate-cleansing lemon keyword label sorbet

Before diving into the next course you need to cleanse your palate with a lemon “label” sorbet.

In Part One, we talked about the struggle of maintaining gigantic lists of keywords. We’ve sampled keywords from our foraged pots, keeping these arranged and segmented in our Moz Pro campaign.

Now you want to give those tracked keywords a more defined purpose in life. This will help to reinforce to your client why you’re tracking these keywords, what the goal is for tracking them, and in what sort of timeframe you’re anticipating results.

Types of labels may include:

  • Local keywords: Is your business serving local people, like a mushroom walking tour? You can add geo modifiers to your keywords and label them as such.
  • Long-tail keywords: Might have lower search volume, but focused intent can convert well for your client.
  • High-priority keywords: Where you’re shoveling more resources, these keywords are more likely impacting the other keyword segments.
  • Brand keywords: Mirror, mirror on the wall… yeah, we all want those vanity keywords, don’t lie. You can manage brand keywords automatically through “Manage Brand Rules” in Moz Pro:

A generous scoop of tasty lemon “label” sorbet will make all the work you do and progress you achieve infinitely easier to report on with clear, actionable focus.

What’s the recipe?

Step 1: Label your keywords like a pro.

Step 2: Filter by labels in the Ranking tab to analyze Search Visibility for your keyword segments.

In this example, I’m comparing our visibility for “learn” keywords against “guide” keywords:

Step 3: Create a custom report for your keyword segments.

Step 4: Add a drizzle of balsamic vinegar by triggering the Optimize button — now you can send the latest on-page reporting with your super-focused ranking report.

Why your client will be impressed

Your ranking reports will be like nothing your client has ever tasted. They will be tightly focused on the segments of keywords you’re working on, so they aren’t bamboozled by a new slew of keywords or a sudden downward trend. By clearly segmenting your piles of lovely keywords, you’ll be proactively answering those inevitable queries about why, when, and in what form your client will begin to see results.

With the on-page scores updating automatically and shipping out to your client’s inbox every month via a custom report, you’ll be effortlessly highlighting what your team has achieved.

[Part three] Steak sandwich links with crispy competitor bacon

You’re working with your client to publish content, amplifying it through social channels and driving brand awareness through PR campaigns.

Now you want to keep them informed of the big wins you’ve had as a result of that grind. Link data in Moz Pro focuses on the highest-quality links with our Mozscape index, coming from the most prominent pages of authoritative sites. So, while you may not see every link for a site within our index, we’re reporting the most valuable ones.

Alongside our top-quality steak sarnie, we’re add some crispy competitor bacon so you can identify what content is working for the other sites in your industry.

What’s the recipe?

Step 1: Check that you have direct competitors set up on your campaign.

Step 2: Compare link metrics for your site and your competitors.

Step 4: Head to Top Pages to see what those competitors are doing to get ahead.

Step 5: Compile a delicious report sandwich!

Step 6: Make another report for Top Pages for the bacon-filled sandwich experience.

Why your client will be impressed

Each quality established link gives your client a clear idea of the value of their content and the blood, sweat, and tears of your team.

These little gems are established and more likely to have an impact on their ranking potential. Don’t forget to have a chat with your client where you explain that a link’s impact on rankings takes time.

By comparing this directly with the other sites battling it out for top SERP property, it’s easier to identify progress and achievements.

By highlighting those pesky competitors and their top pages by authority, you’re also getting ahead of that burning question of: How can we improve?

[Part four] Cinnamon-dusted ranking reports with cherry-glazed traffic

Rankings are a staple ingredient in the SEO diet. Much like the ever-expanding keyword list, reporting on rankings has become something we do without thinking enough about that what clients can do with that information.

Dish up an all-singing, all-dancing cinnamon-dusted rankings report with cherry-glazed traffic by illustrating the direct impact these rankings have on organic traffic. Real people, coasting on through the search results to your client’s site.

Landing Pages in Moz Pro compares rankings with organic landing pages, imparting not just the ranking score but the value of those pages. Compliments to the chef, because that good work is down to you.

What’s the recipe?

Step 1: Track your target keywords in Moz Pro.

Step 2: Check you’ve hooked up Google Analytics for that tasty traffic data.

Step 3: Discover landing pages and estimated traffic share.

As your SEO work drives more traffic to those pages and your keyword rankings steadily increase, you’ll see your estimated traffic share go up.

If your organic traffic from search is increasing but your ranking is dropping off, it’s an indication that this keyword isn’t the driving force.

Now you can have a dig around and find out why that keyword isn’t performing, starting with your on-page optimization and following up with keyword research.

Why your client will be impressed

We all send ranking reports, and I’m sure clients just love it. But now you can dazzle them with an insight into what those rankings mean for the lifeblood of their site.

You can also take action by directing more energy towards those well-performing keywords, or investigate what worked well for those pages and replicate it across other keywords and pages on your site.

Wrapping up

It’s time to say “enough is enough” and inject some flavor into those bland old SEO reports. Your team will save time and your clients will thank you for the tasty buffet of reporting delight.


Next Level is our educational series combining actionable SEO tips with tools you can use to achieve them. Check out any of our past editions below:

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Source: Moz

Retailer Colruyt tops Belgian ranking – highlights from 2017 Belgium RepTrak®

Since 2011, Reputation Institute has published a reputation ranking of the largest, most well-known companies in Belgium. In the recently published results of the 2017 Belgium RepTrak® by Reputation Institute’s partner akkanto, retailer Colruyt tops the list for the sixth time. In this seventh edition of the Belgium RepTrak®, Colruyt achieves an excellent reputation score of 80.1. By doing so, this Belgian enterprise is slowly but surely building a streak that is almost as impressive as that of Philips, which set a world record this year in claiming the top position for the tenth time in the Dutch ranking.

In second place of the RepTrak® Belgium this year we have the airline company Brussels Airlines with a score of 74.3, followed by Belgian mineral water manufacturer Spadel with 72.1. Supermarket chain Delhaize De Leeuw is in fourth position with a score of 70.8. Brussels Airport, victim of terroristic attacks on March 22, 2016, is in fifth place.

2017 Belgium RepTrak® – Reputation Ranking

2017-belgium-reptrak-top-companies

Notable impact of ethical management on the reputation of Belgian companies

In 2017, there was a focus on the influence of CSR (corporate social responsibility) on company reputations. Colruyt also tops the list in this aspect; the company attained the highest CSR-score of all measured companies (73.3). Runners-up are Spadel (67.7) and the pharmaceutical giant Janssen Pharmaceutica (67.0).

What is remarkable is that these scores generally lie 3.8 points lower than the Pulse scores. Even though companies attain lower scores on the so-called CSR-dimensions (Workplace, Governance and Citizenship), the study shows that these dimensions have a big impact on company reputation. The worldwide RepTrak®-results demonstrated that especially Governance (ethical management) is a big influencer on company reputation. This trend can now be observed in Belgium as well: after Products & Services, corporate Governance weighs the most on the reputation score.

belgium-reptrak-drivers-wheel

Average impact of reputation dimensions on overall reputation – Belgium

Millennials give higher scores and move from words to actions

Finally, the RepTrak® Belgium analyzed one target group in particular this year: Millennials – youngsters between the age of 18 and 34. It seems that Millennials are, on average, less harsh on the measured companies. Banks featured in the list (KBC, ING, BNP Paribas Fortis and Belfius), for instance, attain remarkably higher reputation scores amongst young people as compared with other age groups. Brewer AB InBev and telecom company Orange also achieve notably better scores with this generation. What’s more, Millennials show the good impression they have of an enterprise more in their behavior than other age groups. Concretely this means that young people that assign high reputation scores to an organization are more prepared to work for them, to invest in them or to buy products or services from them.

Get the Research

BelgiumRepTrak-coverFor more information, please contact the Reputation Institute Benelux via e-mail at benelux@reputationinstitute.com.

Click here to download the full report in English.


Source: Reputation Institute

Google Gets Big Ninth Circuit Win That Its Eponymous Trademark Isn’t Generic–Elliott v. Google

The Ninth Circuit ruled that “Google” isn’t a generic trademark. This isn’t a surprise because a district court already reached this conclusion in 2014. See my prior blog post, “Google Successfully Defends Its Most Valuable Asset In Court.” Still, the Ninth Circuit’s ruling hands Google–and other well-known brand owners–a powerful and emphatic win.

The court’s opinion delves deeply into genericide geekery, but the top-line conclusion is unambiguous. The court says plainly that “verb use does not automatically constitute generic use.” This eviscerates the plaintiff’s case because, as Judge Watford says in a concurrence, “the plaintiffs produced thousands of pages of largely irrelevant evidence showing merely that ‘google’ is sometimes used as a verb.”

To reach its conclusion, the court says that “we now recognize that an internet user might use the verb “google” in an indiscriminate sense, with no particular search engine in mind; or in a discriminate sense, with the Google search engine in mind.” The court gives an example:

Elliott purports to offer an example of generic use by T-Pain, a popular rap music artist. But we will not assume that T-Pain is using the word “google” in a generic sense simply because he tells listeners to “google [his] name.” T-Pain, Bottlez, on rEVOLVEr (RCA Records 2011). Without further evidence
regarding T-Pain’s inner thought process, we cannot tell whether he is using “google” in a discriminate or indiscriminate sense.

This “discriminate”/”indiscriminate” distinction is a win for other very popular trademarks. For example, the court analogizes the oft-used Kleenex example:

We acknowledge that if a trademark is used as an adjective, it will typically be easier to prove that the trademark is performing a source-identifying function. If a speaker asks for “a Kleenex tissue,” it is quite clear that the speaker has a particular brand in mind. But we will not assume that a speaker has no brand in mind simply because he or she uses the trademark as a noun and asks for “a Kleenex.”

Want to say “Do you Yahoo?” Go for it!

Most of Elliott’s evidence failed because it was designed to show widespread consumer use of Google as a verb, rather than the required showing “that the primary significance of the word ‘google’ to the relevant public is as a name for internet search engines generally and not as a mark identifying the Google search engine in particular.” As a result, the court disregards:

* evidence that Google used its own mark as a verb (adding that lower-case usage is just “grammatical formalism”).
* evidence that “Google” is listed in dictionaries because (A) the dictionaries’ first definition referenced it as a brand, and (B) the secondary definition just reinforced the plaintiff’s basic point that some consumers use “Google” as a verb for searching. “Elliott argues that these dictionaries only refer to the GOOGLE trademark because Google threatened to take legal action if the companies refused to acknowledge its registration. Contrary to Elliott’s assumption, Google’s policing activities weigh against finding genericide.” Yay for trademark bullying of dictionary publishers!
* the lack of good synonyms. “Because not a single competitor calls its search engine ‘a google,’ and because members of the consuming public recognize and refer to different ‘internet search engines,’ Elliott has not shown that there is no available substitute for the word ‘google’ as a generic term.”
* casual press references to Google as a verb:

Documented examples of generic use might support a claim of genericide if they reveal a prevailing public consensus regarding the primary significance of a registered trademark….However, if the parties offer competing examples of both generic and trademark use, this source of evidence is typically insufficient to prove genericide.

Implications

Big Win for Big Trademark Owners. The Google brand is one of the most valuable on earth. The court emphatically endorsed all of its practices (and the significant dollars Google spent preparing this case). I’m sure Google will face other genericide challenges in the future, but this ruling will make such challenges difficult or impossible. Other big brands whose trademarks are often used as verbs or nouns also have a lot of reason to cheer this ruling.

Implications for Keyword Advertising Cases? Though the case doesn’t directly discuss competitive keyword advertising, its ruling may affect those cases. The court makes an interesting distinction between “discriminate” and “indiscriminate” trademark usage by consumers. The former means the consumer is searching for the brand; the latter means that the consumer is thinking about the class of goods that includes the trademark without thinking of any brand in particular. Extrapolated to the competitive keyword advertising context, that’s exactly what happens when consumers use a trademark as a keyword. Some consumers want the trademark owner and no one else; while other consumers are seeking the class of goods and not really thinking about the trademark owner. The Ninth Circuit’s framework can be invoked by competitive keyword advertising defendants to highlight that there is a class of consumers who refer to the trademark but don’t intend to find just the trademark owner. Depending on how much courts value that consumer cohort, it could be fatal to a plaintiff’s case.

Case citation: Elliott v. Google, Inc., No. 15-15809 (9th Cir. May 16, 2017)


Source: Eric Goldman Legal

Esports Contracts: Avoid Getting Bamboozled

esports contractsWhat do professional gamers need to consider when negotiating esports contracts? To avoid disputes, make sure everything is spelled out to the letter. And when we say everything, we mean everything — from equipment quality to pay schedules to break times.

Bottom Line: A good contract is one that’s easy to understand, yet detailed, so both parties know exactly what to expect from one another.

Esports Contracts: Things To Consider

So, what should professional gamers watch for when negotiating agreements?

  • Payment Schedule: Being a professional gamer means getting paid to master video games. The operative word being “paid.” Make sure all compensation details — from price to payment schedule — are clearly delineated in any contract you sign.
  • Equipment Stipulations: It happens! A team signs you. Then, on your first day, you discover that you’re expected to practice on a Commodore 128. (Hey, it could happen.) So, make sure equipment stipulations are part of your esports contract.
  • League / Team Rules: Before you enter into a partnership with a brand or team, make sure they clearly outline what is expected of you, on both behavioral, performance, and even ethical grounds.
  • Insurance: Are there insurance implications of which you should be aware? Find out and get any stipulations in writing. Moreover, consider medical insurance. Will the organization be providing it, in whole or in part? Does it include dental and vision? Does it come out of your salary?
  • Non-Compete: Are you allowed to participate on other teams? What about individual streaming channels — can you continue making residual income on platforms like Twitch? Find out the answers before you agree to anything.
  • Term Length: Before scribbling your John Hancock on the dotted line, make sure you’re comfortable with the duration of the contract terms. The industry is blowing up; things are rapidly evolving; so, ask yourself: Do I really want to stay with a team or sponsor for more than a year? Now, you very well may want to — just make sure you give it thought.

Esports Is Still Evolving…And So Is Esports Law

From the way fans watch matches to the types of injuries players sustain “on the field,” there are still many practical and legal esports issues with which the industry must grapple.

At this juncture, the best thing players can do is be fastidious about what types of contracts and agreements they sign. After all, you want to be fairly compensated for your skills and profit potential, right? Well, the first step in making sure that happens is a rock-solid contract.

Kelly / Warner consults with esports athletes on everything from contract negotiations to team disputes. Get in touch today to begin the conversation.

The post Esports Contracts: Avoid Getting Bamboozled appeared first on Kelly / Warner Law | Defamation Law, Internet Law, Business Law.


Source: Kelly Warner Law

What You Need to Know About Duplicate GMB Listings [Excerpt from the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO]

Posted by JoyHawkins

Recently, I’ve had a lot of people ask me how to deal with duplicate listings in Google My Business now that MapMaker is dead. Having written detailed instructions outlining different scenarios for the advanced local SEO training manual I started selling over at LocalU, I thought it’d be great to give Moz readers a sample of 5 pages from the manual outlining some best practices.


What you need to know about duplicate GMB listings

Before you start, you need to find out if the listing is verified. If the listing has an “own this business” or “claim this business” option, it is not currently verified. If missing that label, it means it is verified — there is nothing you can do until you get ownership or have it unverified (if you’re the one who owns it in GMB). This should be your first step before you proceed with anything below.

Storefronts

  • Do the addresses on the two listings match? If the unverified duplicate has the same address as the verified listing, you should contact Google My Business support and ask them to merge the two listings.
  • If the addresses do not match, find out if the business used to be at that address at some point in time.
    • If the business has never existed there:

      • Pull up the listing on Maps
      • Press “Suggest an edit”
      • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed” to Yes
      • Select “Never existed” as the reason and press submit. *Note: If there are reviews on the listing, you should get them transferred before doing this.
  • If the duplicate lists an address that is an old address (they were there at some point but have moved), you will want to have the duplicate marked as moved.

Service area businesses

  • Is the duplicate listing verified? If it is, you will first have to get it unverified or gain access to it. Once you’ve done that, contact Google My Business and ask them to merge the two listings.
  • If the duplicate is not verified, you can have it removed from Maps since service area businesses are not permitted on Google Maps. Google My Business allows them, but any unverified listing would follow Google Maps rules, not Google My Business. To remove it:
    • Pull up the listing on Maps
    • Press “Suggest an edit”
    • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed” to Yes
    • Select “Private” as the reason and press submit. *Note: If there are reviews on the listing, you should get them transferred before doing this.

Practitioner listings

Public-facing professionals (doctors, lawyers, dentists, realtors, etc.) are allowed their own listings separate from the office they work for, unless they’re the only public-facing professional at that office. In that case, they are considered a solo practitioner and there should only be one listing, formatted as “Business Name: Professional Name.”

Solo practitioner with two listings

This is probably one of the easiest scenarios to fix because solo practitioners are only supposed to have one listing. If you have a scenario where there’s a listing for both the practice and the practitioner, you can ask Google My Business to merge the two and it will combine the ranking strength of both. It will also give you one listing with more reviews (if each individual listing had reviews on it). The only scenario where I don’t advise combining the two is if your two listings both rank together and are monopolizing two of the three spots in the 3-pack. This is extremely rare.

Multi-practitioner listings

If the business has multiple practitioners, you are not able to get these listings removed or merged provided the practitioner still works there. While I don’t generally suggest creating listings for practitioners, they often exist already, leaving people to wonder what to do with them to keep them from competing with the listing for the practice.

A good strategy is to work on having multiple listings rank if you have practitioners that specialize in different things. Let’s say you have a chiropractor who also has a massage therapist at his office. The massage therapist’s listing could link to a page on the site that ranks highly for “massage therapy” and the chiropractor could link to the page that ranks highest organically for chiropractic terms. This is a great way to make the pages more visible instead of competing.

Another example would be a law firm. You could have the main listing for the law firm optimized for things like “law firm,” then have one lawyer who specializes in personal injury law and another lawyer who specializes in criminal law. This would allow you to take advantage of the organic ranking for several different keywords.

Keep in mind that if your goal is to have three of your listings all rank for the exact same keyword on Google, thus monopolizing the entire 3-pack, this is an unrealistic strategy. Google has filters that keep the same website from appearing too many times in the results and unless you’re in a really niche industry or market, it’s almost impossible to accomplish this.

Practitioners who no longer work there

It’s common to find listings for practitioners who no longer work for your business but did at some point. If you run across a listing for a former practitioner, you’ll want to contact Google My Business and ask them to mark the listing as moved to your practice listing. It’s extremely important that you get them to move it to your office listing, not the business the practitioner now works for (if they have been employed elsewhere). Here is a good case study that shows you why.

If the practitioner listing is verified, things can get tricky since Google My Business won’t be able to move it until it’s unverified. If the listing is verified by the practitioner and they refuse to give you access or remove it, the second-best thing would be to get them to update the listing to have their current employer’s information on it. This isn’t ideal and should be a last resort.

Listings for employees (not public-facing)

If you find a listing for a non-public-facing employee, it shouldn’t exist on Maps. For example: an office manager of a law firm, a paralegal, a hygienist, or a nurse. You can get the listing removed:

  • Pull up the listing on Maps
  • Press “Suggest an edit”
  • Switch the toggle beside “Place is permanently closed..” to Yes
  • Select “Never existed” as the reason and press submit.

Listings for deceased practitioners

This is always a terrible scenario to have to deal with, but I’ve run into lots of cases where people don’t know how to get rid of listings for deceased practitioners. The solution is similar to what you would do for someone who has left the practice, except you want to add an additional step. Since the listings are often verified and people usually don’t have access to the deceased person’s Google account, you want to make sure you tell Google My Business support that the person is deceased and include a link to their obituary online so the support worker can confirm you’re telling the truth. I strongly recommend using either Facebook or Twitter to do this, since you can easily include the link (it’s much harder to do on a phone call).

Creating practitioner listings

If you’re creating a practitioner listing from scratch, you might run into issues if you’re trying to do it from the Google My Business dashboard and you already have a verified listing for the practice. The error you would get is shown below.

There are two ways around this:

  1. Create the listing via Google Maps. Do this by searching the address and then clicking “Add a missing place.” Do not include the firm/practice name in the title of the listing or your edit most likely won’t go through, since it will be too similar to the listing that already exists for the practice. Once you get an email from Google Maps stating the listing has been successfully added, you will be able to claim it via GMB.
  2. Contact GMB support and ask them for help.

We hope you enjoyed this excerpt from the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO! The full 160+-page guide is available for purchase and download via LocalU below.

Get the Expert’s Guide to Local SEO

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Source: Moz