Topic: Reputation

Reputation tips and tricks

Our Team’s Favorite Local Businesses 0

One of our company’s core values is Reverence for Local, which our team embodies both inside and outside of our office.

Get to know some of our team’s favorite local businesses across the country:


Photo via @thevegannom on Instagram

The Vegan Nom

Austin, Texas

“It’s an all-vegan taco truck, and they have the most amazing vegan queso, nachos, and of course, tacos. It’s the kind of small business that thrives in Austin, and that’s part of why I’m proud to live here. Most of all, I love that they’ve normalized me eating nachos for brunch.” — Molly Knobloch, Community Manager

Olive

Austin, Texas / New York City

“Laura, the owner, has created a boutique that radiates a unique and fresh look. Everything is carefully curated and the employees feel like your friends. The store also fosters a strong local community through outreach and community events to empower women.” — Marissa Desanti, Product Designer

The Oxford Creamery

Mattapoisett, Massachusetts

“As a kid, I typically spent a good portion of my summer break visiting family in New England, and going to The Ox was always one of the biggest highlights. In their own words, The Ox “is local New England in every sense of the word” — it’s an old school, family-owned restaurant that doesn’t seem to have changed one bit since it opened in the ’30s. I have distinct memories of spending time with my granddad at The Ox where he’d teach me life lessons, including the best strategies for eating an ice cream cone and how you should never wear your hat at the dinner table.” — Andy Moore, Manager, Customer Operations


Photo via @luckylabatx on Instagram

Lucky Lab Coffee

Austin, Texas

“First off, their coffee is the best in Austin, bar none. One of the coolest parts of Lucky Lab, though, is that part of their proceeds go to different organizations that benefit dogs (shelters, rescue groups, etc.) They also host all kinds of different events, and they’re super popular and beloved in the Austin community.” — Regan Sinquefield, Community Manager

The Village Haven

North Smithfield, Rhode Island

“The Village Haven is a staple for those who are from Rhode Island and has been serving customers for over 40 years. Growing up, some of my fondest memories have been enjoying their classic chicken dinner with my family and delighting in their delicious ice cream for dessert. Not to mention, they have the best cinnamon rolls.” — Richard Hoey, Account Manager

The Special

Austin, Texas

“The store’s aesthetic is perfect, the product selection is unorthodox and daring, the owner is divine, and the custom gifting service is magical. Go now.” — Carey Neal, Account Manager


Photo via @palomaeiza on Instagram

Thirsty’s

Pittsford, New York

“Okay where do I start? Well, it starts with the fact that I wouldn’t be here without Thirsty’s — my parents met there in 1979. It’s been a staple in my hometown for over 40 years, without so much as a sign out front. Literally, it’s a white brick building with green shutters, and you wouldn’t know it was a bar until you step inside. Drinks are cheap and served in plastic party cups, and it’s always a party when you walk in. There’s an impromptu reunion for every high school class every year around Thanksgiving and Christmas, and you can celebrate with your friends…. and your friends’ parents. My happiest place is on a stool at the bar drinking a local beer with friends I haven’t seen in months!” — Emily Howeth, Event Marketing Associate

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Our Team’s Favorite Local Businesses was originally published in Main Street Hub on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Source: Main Street Hub

#38 – Uber’s $100k hacker cover up, McDonald’s Black Friday winning fail, and a Denver coffee shop in hot water! 0

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A tale of two coffee social media campaigns. One will get you pumped up and the other frothing at the mouth!

Each week, Erin Jones and I take a look at the most interesting reputation management stories, answer your questions, and share valuable ORM tactics. In this week’s episode:

If you have a question you would like us to tackle, please leave a comment below or on my Facebook Page.

Transcript (forgive us for any typos):

Coming Soon!

The post #38 – Uber’s $100k hacker cover up, McDonald’s Black Friday winning fail, and a Denver coffee shop in hot water! appeared first on Andy Beal .


Source: Andy Beal

Cars & Customer Service: Kingston Collision 0

After years of working for car dealerships and auto repair shops, David Rowe decided to open his own repair shop in Kingston, New York.

Kingston Collision was opened by David and his wife Lisa in the spring of 2003, and for the past 13 years, the shop has prided itself on providing unparalleled customer service to the Kingston community.

Between the two of them, they have over 35 years of experience in automotive repair and insurance claims.

Learn more about David, his shop, and his partnership with Main Street Hub:

Why did you open your repair shop in Kingston?

“I’ve lived here all my life. I’m a 4th generation resident. I have good contacts and know everyone in the area. It’s a very nice community. It’s not that small, and it’s not that big. Word-of-mouth business travels very fast — it’s been a very successful part of our business here.”

What’s your favorite thing about owning an auto repair shop?

“Helping people get back on the road with their life. We deal with some pretty horrendous collisions. We handle everything here, so people can go about healing themselves and getting their families back together.”

Why did you decide to partner with Main Street Hub?

“I don’t have time to do what you guys do. There are so many restraints and responsibilities with running a small business. I don’t have time. You do it very well.”

Has there been a moment in the partnership that stands out to you as your favorite?

“That photo shoot was great. It was something we never expected.”

How has Main Street Hub helped you accomplish your goals?

“That’s really hard to pick anything out. Just because you do what you do, that’s helped me. My wife watches all the postings you guys put up — it puts us out in front of our community, and there’s no way I would be able to do that.

“It’s amazing what Main Street Hub does, and it’s nice to have somebody that does what they say they’re going to do.”

“It’s helped in our area — we’re number one on Yelp, and that adds to it.”

Learn more about our customers and love for local here, and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram so you don’t miss a thing!



Cars & Customer Service: Kingston Collision was originally published in Main Street Hub on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Source: Main Street Hub

Create Enjoyable Experiences For Your Customers 0

Event ideas for your local business

Few things feel better as a local business owner than the feeling of building relationships with your community and loyal customers.

A great way to build relationships with your customers is to host events at your business — 74% of people who attend events at local businesses have a more favorable opinion of the business afterwards.

In addition to making your customers love you more, hosting events tends to positively impact sales.

Not sure what types of events to host? Check out these suggestions from Regional Development Representative Geoffrey Brown!

Host VIP Events

If you are a local boutique or a retail space, hosting something after-hours for your valued customers is a great way to make them feel special. If you have an early shipment or hot items that are coming in, showcase that to the customers who are most loyal to your brand.

You can promote this event by sending an email to your special customers. This is also a great opportunity to get in-person feedback from your shoppers!

Need help building up your email marketing program? Check out these email marketing tips, and learn how to build a loyalty program here!

Sponsor Local Sports Leagues

Sponsoring local sports leagues — like Little League Baseball or Pee Wee Football — is a great way to foster relationships with your community and make these families feel special at your business.

You can offer special menus or discounts to the teams when they come visit your business after the game in their uniforms!

Yappy Hour

If you’re a restaurant or bar with an outdoor patio, host a weekly happy hour that is dog-friendly! Remember to have plenty of water bowls around — and offer a biscuit to every furry friend as they arrive.

Make sure you take photos of this event to use on your social media pages! This is a goldmine for content — people love seeing dogs on social media and your business too!

Learn more about making your small business pet-friendly here.

Award Season Specials

Make annual events out of the big awards shows, like The Golden Globes or the Grammys. Have customers dress up and give out prizes of your own — Best Dressed, Most Creative Costume, etc.

You can show the awards shows on televisions in your business, and if you’re a restaurant, create themed menus for each show. Make your customers feel like they’re on the red carpet while they’re at your business!

Trivia Night

Trivia nights are a great way to boost profits and bring in new customers on slower nights. Pick a trivia topic that’s relevant and something that will keep your audience there and engaged — decade trivia, TV show trivia, and current events trivia are all crowd pleasers!

Reward players for their hard work — you can give away store gift cards to the winners to make them happy and also, keep them coming back to your business.

Percentage Night

Contact your favorite local charity, and vow to donate a percentage of your profits to them on a certain night. This can be a standalone event or a recurring one. Percentage nights not only get your business involved with a local charity, but it’s a great way for your customers to feel involved in their community!

Want to learn more about connecting with your community? Check out our tips to help small businesses give back!

Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram so you don’t miss resources like this.



Create Enjoyable Experiences For Your Customers was originally published in Main Street Hub on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Source: Main Street Hub

How To Remove Yourself And Opt Out From Radaris 0

There are plenty of people out there who have issues with public record sites like Radaris. The problem is that unlike a lot of other sites, the Radaris opt out process isn’t that straightforward.

As a matter of fact, thousands of people look up how to opt out of Radaris in each month.

We get many questions about this site as well, so we thought it would be helpful to lay out all of your options regarding how to remove yourself from Radaris.

What is Radaris?

In their own words, “Radaris is a comprehensive public records search engine for information about people, properties, businesses and professionals”. So what exactly does that mean? Radaris is an information broker or people-search site. Radaris.com finds, collects and centralizes data about people and then creates an in-depth profile of the subject.

This profile is then fully available to anyone who requests and purchases it. Hence, the growing interest in how to remove yourself from Radaris.

Radaris claims, “we are the industry’s provider of the most comprehensive profiles sourcing data from the nation’s largest providers and dynamically integrating these profiles with social mentions, factual references and billions of public records in real time. Your profiles are continuously changing and expanding as public digital data is captured.”

Radaris uses a number of resources for gathering this information, but before you can opt out of Radaris, you need to understand how the service works. There are three main approaches used by people-finder companies:

  1. Purchasing information from commercial or marketing indexes, collecting it into a database, and packaging it into a product that can be sold.
  2. Crawling the Internet for free content indexed by search engines and creating a searchable database based on this information.
  3. Combining Internet searches with “Deep Web” searches of commercial and government databases, then selling access instead of creating a database.

In addition to selling these in-depth profiles of people and businesses, Radaris also offers paid monitoring services so that you receive alerts as new information is added to your profile over time. However, this is a reactive strategy that will not truly remove yourself from Radaris.

Is Radaris attacking your privacy?
For people who are concerned about online privacy, Radaris, (and sites like it) poses serious threats to maintaining just that. Radaris finds virtually any records accessible online, or through various databases to provide as much information about a person, business or property  as possible.

Unfortunately, because these are all technically accessible by law, Radaris won’t face any negative consequences for sharing this kind of information. Public access to this  information in small quantities may not seem like a threat, but when these pieces are bundled together as profiles, this can feel invasive. This is why researching the Radaris opt out process is so important.

Understanding Public Records When Learning How To Remove Yourself From Radaris

According to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and other Federal open records laws, access to government documents and public records is a must. This obviously has clear benefits, but also leads to the need for understanding the Radaris opt out process (and for other sites like it).

State “sunshine” laws let the public gain access to government documents and scrutinize the behavior of public officials.

When it comes to identifying where the information in on a profile comes from and how to remove yourself from Radaris, consider the following sources:

Data Sources

  • District courts
  • Local government
  • County registries
  • Police reports
  • Criminal records web sites
  • Licenses registries
  • Deeds registries
  • Local and state phone directories
  • USPTO
  • White Pages

Information you’ll find from records in Radaris:

According to the site, Radaris lets you find the following information all in one place:

  • Phone numbers
  • Address history
  • Patent filings
  • Property records
  • Professional histories
  • Social media account profiles
  • Profiles photos and related images

While the site emphasizes the ease of finding all of this information in one place, it begs the question – why does this information need to be accessible to anyone? There’s likely a reason why so many people want to learn how to remove themselves from Radaris. While professional background checks seem like a natural fit for this sort of site, Radaris claims that these profiles and reports are ideal for the following:

  • Conduct basic background checks on people you see every day, but need to know better
  • Find an old classmate or long lost friend
  • Learn your online date’s personal history
  • Monitor your own web presence
  • And much more…

The amount of control you have over your own privacy depends on the approach used by information brokers like Radaris. Radaris uses a combination of methods for their data collection which results in very thorough profiles. The company may even goes so far as to send representatives to courthouses and other government offices to gather information not yet available online.

Before completing a Radaris opt out, you need to know the following (according to them):

Unfortunately, Radaris doesn’t offer the easiest of solutions when it comes to getting your own information removed from the site.  While they do technically offer an opt out function, Radaris makes you jump through hoops to make it work.

If you explore the option of removing your name and information from Radaris, the site makes a point to hammer home the following:

radaris remove yourself instructions1. The information that Radaris shares is publicly available. Radaris emphasizes that all of the information they post is publicly accessible, and go on to list where it comes from. This is important to note, because even when you request to opt out of listings from Radaris, the information itself is still available to anyone who decides to access those sources listed.

2. Radaris is not a monopoly. The second page of “Control Your Information” lists some of the top players when it comes to data providers. The point here is not just to acknowledge the competition, but to make the user aware of other data providers that are likely sharing the exact same information and must be contacted directly as well in order to make this personal information less visible.

radaris opt out data collection

3. Tons of Data Brokers and Websites are also sharing this information. The data providers listed above aren’t the only sources that reveal your personal information. In fact, there are a number of brokers and sites that aggregate personal information about individuals and businesses alike. And the same thought process as listed above. If you want to scrub the internet of this information, then you have to start by going through all sites listed below to make individual requests for removal. The Radaris remove yourself plan goes further than their own site.

Only after making note of the major databases that also aggregate your information, does Radaris take you through the steps necessary to request an opt out through their website.

Additional Recommendations From Radaris On Their Opt-Out Process

In addition to the requests made for removal by Radaris, they suggest that you also need to opt out of a number of other databases that they pull from. You can find this list of opt out sources in its entirety here.
If you worry about your privacy and would like to monitor, edit or remove your publicly available personal information here is a guide below on how to do this.

To actually have Radaris remove yourself from their records:

Getting your records removed from sites like Radaris isn’t always straightforward. That said, you can certainly opt out from Radaris if you follow the right procedures.

Follow all directives to connect to Radaris and modify the information that is (or is not) shared on their site.

Currently you can do this by following these steps:

  1. Scroll to the bottom of the home page and select “Control Your Info”control your info radaris
  2. Click “Continue” through the following 3 pagesradaris remove yourself instructionsradaris opt out data collectionradaris remove yourself distribution
  3. Type your name into the bar on the last page and see what records come up. If you are a statutory-protected individual like a law enforcement officer, judge or district attorney, proceed to Step 7:radaris name entry
  4. From there, either “no records” will come up or you will see a number of results that share variations of your name. From here, choose the profile that pertains to you. Click “Background check & Contact Info”. Once you click that tab, choose “Control Info”.control info radaris
  5. From here Radaris will require you to share information that confirms that you are who you say you are. While you should be honest with supporting documentation, feel free to use an email address or phone number that differs from your personal email address and phone number. And if you share identification documents, blur out id’s and as much info as possible while still proving that you are who you say you are.
  6. From there follow directives to remove your information from the site.
  7.  If you are a statutory-protected individual like a law enforcement officer, judge or district attorney, you’ll have a different set of rules to follow, and make sure that you click the link on the 4th page.radaris remove yourself step 7

Once you have followed all of these steps and removed yourself from Radaris you should look into playing a little defense. Sign up for our free tool to take control of your online reputation and protect your information.

The post How To Remove Yourself And Opt Out From Radaris appeared first on BrandYourself Blog | ORM And Personal Branding.


Source: Brandyourself